Culture & History

  • Saint Theodosius the Great, Emperor of the Romans (17 January)

    Theodosius the Great was Roman Emperor from 379 to 395. Theodosius was the last emperor to rule over both the eastern and the western halves of the Roman Empire. On 27 February 380, he declared “Catholic Christianity” the only legitimate imperial religion, ending state support for the traditional Roman religion. On 27 February 380 he,…

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  • Thessaloniki, a Timeless Byzantine City

    Thessaloniki offers a brilliant showcase of the evolution of Byzantine art and architecture, spanning centuries of the city’s remarkable history of strategy, struggle and survival. As the pandemic continues to change our daily routines, we look around for a sense of stability, of reliable permanence. In Thessaloniki, there is so much to marvel at which…

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  • Print in the Greek Revolution | Athens | To February 27

    The National Library of Greece (NLG) and the Stavros Niarchos Foundation Cultural Center (SNFCC) present an exhibition titled “The Printing Houses during the Greek Revolution.” The exhibition seeks to highlight the instrumental role of the printing press in the crucial years of the Greek War of Independence. Despite tremendous difficulties in procuring the necessary technical…

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  • Celebrated painter Alekos Fassianos dies at 86

    Alekos Fassianos, one of the most important modern Greek painters, died Sunday at his home after a long illness, the state news agency ANA reported. He was 86. Alekos Fassianos was born in Athens on Dec. 16, 1935. He studied violin at the Athens Conservatory and painting at the Athens School of Fine Arts from…

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  • The Fine Art of the Doulamas

    An acclaimed expert of traditional Greek garments, Aristidis Tzonevrakis seeks to marry the philosophy of traditional outfits with the stylish present. A dark blue, urban style doulamas dominates this Argos workshop. Its base is woolen, like felt, and its embroidery is crafted with twisted, silver metallic thread. A formal military outfit of a bygone era, this imposing…

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  • Preserving a centuries-old fishing heritage in Aitoloakarnania

    Formed by the double delta of two rivers, the Acheloos and the Evinos, the Mesolongi-Aitoliko lagoons complex in the northern part of the Gulf of Patra is one of the largest and most biodiverse lagoon systems in the Mediterranean. Protected by the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands, and included in the Natura 2000 network, the Mesolongi-Aitoliko…

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  • The establishment of the “blue and white” Flag of Greece 200 years ago, by the First National Assembly of Epidaurus

    On December 20, 1821, at the end of the year that marked the uprising and the independence of the Greeks, the First National Assembly or the First National Assembly of Epidaurus began in the current area of ​​New Epidaurus, Argolida. The work of the National Assembly that paved the way for the institutional formation of…

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  • Times of London Says Parthenon Marbles Belong in Greece

    LONDON – Shifting its position and putting more pressure on the British Museum and the the United Kingdom government, The Times of London called for the return of the stolen Parthenon Marbles to Greece. Still calling them The Elgin Marbles – named for the 19th Century Scottish diplomat who ripped them off the Parthenon 200 years ago…

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  • Saint Paisios – “From Farasa to Heaven” – New historical, biographical series on Mega TV

    A modern Saint. An emblematic figure who enlightened many people with his spiritual speech. The new historical-biographical series “Saint Paisios”, which comes to MEGA TV with a select cast of actors, follows the course and life of Saint Paisios, from his birth until the moment he decided to become a monk. The screenplay is written…

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  • Emperor Theodosius I

    Theodosius I, byname Theodosius the Great, in full Flavius Theodosius, (born January 11, 347, Cauca, Gallaecia [now Coca, Spain]—died January 17, 395, Mediolanum [now Milan, Italy]), Romanemperor of the East (379–392) and then sole emperor of both East and West (392–395), who, in vigorous suppression of paganism and Arianism, established the creed of the Council of Nicaea (325) as the universal…

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