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Venerable Thomas of Mount Malea (7 July)

Saint Thomas of Mount Maleos (Maleós) was a military commander before becoming a monk. Strong and brave, he participated in many battles, and brought victories to his countrymen, for which he won much glory and honor. But, striving toward God with all his heart, Saint Thomas forsook the world and its vanity, and was tonsured as a monk.

With great humility he visited several Elders, asking for guidance in the spiritual life. After several years, Thomas received a blessing to live a solitary life in the wilderness. According to his biographers, Saint Thomas said that he was led by a pillar of fire to Mount Maleos by the Prophet Elias, while in an ancient Syaxarion of Constantinople it is written that Saint Thomas also appeared as a pillar of fire when the Holy Prophet Elias appeared to him, whose zealous way of life he emulated.

Dwelling in complete seclusion, Saint Thomas fought with invisible enemies with as much courage as he had displayed against the visible foes of his country. Reports of Saint Thomas’s holy life could not be concealed from those living in the surrounding area. People began to flock to him seeking spiritual guidance, and those who suffered from sickness recovered, since he received from God a blessing to heal their infirmities.

He was always helping others, because even during his solitude, he prayed for everyone, and he trained himself to become a worthy instrument of God for the benefit of his neighbor.

Many of the faithful received help through the prayers of the Righteous Thomas. Even after his repose in the X century, he continues to heal those who seek his aid, from every passion and sickness.

Some of the Saint’s Holy Relics are located in the Metropolis of Monemvasia and Sparta. He is particularly venerated in Lakonia (Lakonίa).

7 Ιουλίου γιορτή: Όσιος Θωμάς ο εν Μαλεώ - ΕΚΚΛΗΣΙΑ ONLINE

Saint Thomas, though wealthy in material goods, though illustrious for the military trophies he had won in wars against the barbarians, forsook all that he had that he might gain Christ, and was led by a pillar of fire to Mount Maleon. By divine grace he wrought wonders, cast out demons, gave sight to the blind, caused springs of water to gush forth, healed many, and while in prayer appeared as a pillar of fire. The century in which he lived is not known.

Thomas was at first a commander distinguished by his bravery and wealth. He was massive of body and struck fear in his enemies. But when Thomas came to love Christ more than the world and everything in the world, he left all and withdrew into the wilderness. There he was tonsured a monk and gave himself over to asceticism. St. Elias the Prophet appeared to him and led him to a mountain called Malea, near Athos, the Holy Mountain. There he lived alone and isolated–alone with God, in prayer day and night. But even though he concealed himself from the world, he could not remain hidden. Upon learning about the sanctity of his life, people began to come to him and bring their sick. And St. Thomas cured people from every infirmity and affliction. Even after he fell asleep in the Lord in the tenth century, his relics continued to help all those who venerated them with faith.

Apolytikion of Thomas of Malea

Plagal of the Fourth Tone

The image of God, was faithfully preserved in you, O Father. For you took up the Cross and followed Christ. By Your actions you taught us to look beyond the flesh for it passes, rather to be concerned about the soul which is immortal. Wherefore, O Holy Thomas, your soul rejoices with the angels.

Kontakion of Thomas of Malea

Plagal of the Fourth Tone

Leaving the army that is earthly and corruptible, thou didst ascend into the mountain of unceasing prayer, joining battle with the spirits of nether darkness. And since thou didst overcome thy fleshless enemies, thou was brought to thine eternal King in victory; hence we cry to thee: Rejoice, O Thomas of godly mind.

Source: oca.org / goarch.org / westserbdio.org